Art Since Pop – John A. Walker

This little book helped to guide me through my Art College days in Exeter and Wolverhampton and is one of those reference books that follow you and stay with you through out your life. ‘Art Since Pop‘ is a book that I would put as my number 1, published in 1975 (by Dolphin) it simply sets out to do what is written in it’s  title, explaining art movements such as Process Art, Land Art, Conceptual Art and Body Art, in a brief but concise way. None of the movements of fine art covered in this pocket book are dealt with in great depth but it provides an informed introduction to these different concepts and methodologies. The beauty of this book is the fact that it was written closer to ‘as it was happening‘ and gives an optimistic appraisal of art movements that have since been sidelined or dismissed as mere Cul-de-sacs.

John A. Walker (b. 1938) is a British art critic and historian who has written over 15 books on modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on mass media. He has also written on design history methodology. Walker’s books include Art since Pop (1975), Design history and the history of design with Judy Attfield (1990), John Latham: The Incidental Person – His Art and Ideas (1994), Cultural Offensive: America’s Impact on British Art since 1945 (1998),[4] Art & Outrage (1999), Supercollector: A Critique of Charles Saatchi with Rita Hatton (2000),Left Shift: Radical Art in 1970s Britain (2001), Art in the Age of Mass Media (3rd ed.: 2001), Art and Celebrity (2003) and Firefighters in Art and Media: A Pictorial History (2009).

Walker was a Reader in Art and Design History at Middlesex University near London until retiring in 1999. He was trained as a painter at Newcastle upon Tyne.


John A. Walker. (2010, March 8). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 05:39, July 31, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=John_A._Walker&oldid=348586319


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About peter

'Death by Sushi' Fish can kill me. When I was very small (maybe 3 or 4 years old) my grandfather, who lost the sight of one eye from a bullet fired by a German sniper (fortunately not a very good one) during the Battle of the Somme in World War 1, wiped my face with the corner of his apron, an apron he had used to wipe his filleting knife on. He was a grocery shopkeeper who specialized in wet fish.

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