Category Archives: Photography

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Old pentax lenses on a digital camera #pentax

I love mixing old technology with new technology

This lens (number 7734948) was originally made available for the Pentax Spotmatic (SP 1000 etc.) 35mm film camera bodies. They have a 42mm screw thread and with an adapter can be used on modern DSLRs

The plant photograph was taken with this lens on a Pentax K-01 Digital Camera

#Pentax SP – #Takumar 1:2/55mm lens ideal for #DSLR cameras

Takumar 1:2/55mm lenses are the perfect manual lens for DSLR cameras

Takumar 1:2/55mm lens

Pentax cameras of this era came with fantastic standard lenses. The one I purchased off ebay came with an original Takumar 1:2/55mm lens, a great lens that is flexible and precise. Takumar is the name that Asahi Optical gave to its lenses, which they used on Asahi Pentax cameras. These lenses were named after the Japanese-American portrait painter, Takuma Kajiwara.

Pentax SP 500 -Takumar 1:2/55mm lens

When the first Pentax Spotmatic was introduced to the public at the 1960 PHOTOKINA, photographic fair, in Cologne, Germany, it attracted the instant and close attention of photographers and photographic engineers alike.

The model range included the original Spotmatic, Spotmatic II and IIa, Spotmatic F, plus the SP500 and SP1000. There was also the Pentax SL, which was identical to the Spotmatic except that it did not have the built-in light meter.

To buy a Takumar 1:2/55mm lens click on the images above or here

Harbour, Fowey, Cornwall

#Fowey in #Cornwall – Pentax Espio 120mi #pentax #35mm #film – Vintage film cameras

I have never been one for bobbing about in a little sailing dingy – I prefer something with an engine. Power, speed – the age of sail has been dead for over a century. Little harbours like Fowey make me laugh – pretty little boats with pretty little sails. The perfect place to paint a commercial painting for the tourists. Hahaha. :)

Fowey is a small town, civil parish and cargo port at the mouth of the River Fowey in south Cornwall, England, United Kingdom – an over priced middle class refuge, full of people who can’t afford Sandbanks or a ‘Sunseeker’. 😉

These photographs above was taken using a Pentax Espio 120mi, which I obtained from a charity shop for £1.50 and is point-and-shoot, mid-range, 35mm film camera. The Espio is an autofocus unit with automatic exposure settings and a built in flash unit.

High Street, Fowey, Cornwall

High Street, Fowey, Cornwall

Is this Art? #photography

Fine art photography is suppose to be created with the vision of an artist. Fine art photography is the opposite of photojournalism or holiday snapping – which provides a visual account for either news or family events. Commercial photography is used to advertise products or services.

I don’t think photography can ever be a ‘Fine Art’

These images were taken using  a Pentax SP1000 35mm camera. This camera was my father’s, who bought it from new in the 1970s. All Pentax Spotmatics (SP) use the M42 screw-thread lens mount. The lenses are focused at maximum aperture to give a bright viewfinder image for focusing, then a switch at the side stops the lens down and switches on the metering to enable the exposure to be set prior to shutter release.

I love the slightly over cooked vintage feel of these images, scratches, dust, and fibre strands -35mm film is far more fun than digital.

Trying to make a silk purse from a sow’s ear

Westward Ho! is a ridiculous, bizarre  and unusual name for a seaside shithole

These photographs were taken using a Pentax Espio 120mi, which I obtained from a charity shop for £1.50 and is an appropriate junkshop camera to take images of a low market, seaside, caravan site infested, blot on the landscape.

I have done my best to make this place look as attractive as I can…

westward_ho westward_ho_pebbles

The village name comes from the title of Charles Kingsley’s novel Westward Ho! (1855) which was set in nearby Bideford. The book was a bestseller, and entrepreneurs saw the opportunity to develop tourism in the area. Which explains why a perfectly beautiful piece of coast looks like an inner city crap hole.